Review: Star Trek TOS, S1Ep11 and 12 "The Menagerie": One Beep for a Dying Colonialism

The ideal of an harmonious human race necessitates external threats, but the fantasy of the show is pernicious by making the threatening aliens so frequently absent. This works as a variation of Edward Said’s concept of Orientalism in that discourse about the other (aliens) is controlled by European (Federation) writers, so that the subjects of inquiry are given no voice in creating a knowledge base about them. The result is a total demonization of the other that justifies continued cultural and political domination via colonization.

Bubbles

Writing at the crossroads of introspection, poetry, prose, and marketing:

"What is it about the soap bubble that so fascinates and delights the child? Does he see himself in its shimmering ephemerality? Its wayward flight so like his own thoughts, borne up by the slightest breeze with no purpose but to explore the expansive world out there until all becomes one? The rapid expansion of the sphere, so like his own belly never satiated? Its spectacular end, unpredictable but glorious?

The child’s mind, a bubble eagerly growing, absorbing the breath of truth from the parent’s lips. No discernment of the wind’s quality, but puff too hard and interrupt the surface tension that holds the mind in airy limits. Questions blow with the buoyancy of a fragile circle: what makes it go and why can it never be fully grasped? The soundness of the mind, round and carefree with no edges like the bubble listing at the parent’s whim, is an object easily popped and too perfect to last. 

No less body than brain, to grow, reform, contract, betray its substance and alight afresh from fleeting, endless cycles of time. Each resurgence full of potential, yet so much the fluid of life from which it emerges. The bubble: a mystery to the child as the child is mystery to himself. The parent’s mastery, of bubbles and child alike, is mystery too, as transient as the substances to which it gives life, as inconstant as the breaths and the breather."

 

Mini-Golf of Summers Past

Spring is upon us, and that means it's time to hit the links in a small way. MINI GOLF! is a big passion of mine, and I here offer a review of the Ottawa mini golf scene. Sadly, I have not been to any of these locations since the original posting of this article (December 2013), but I trust the reviews still hold true. I think you'll agree that when it comes to planning your next golf date, these reviews will help you make it a hole in one.

Transmitting The Tea Party’s “Alarum”

Dante’s journey through the Inferno is designed to prepare him for divine truth by seeing, but not taking part in, the punishments of the damned. Martin likewise describes his own “slide . . . down a staircase” to “taste the truth” through “a seizure of the senses” with “a foot in the grave”. The language mirrors the descriptions of lust and the other sins in terms of letting go control, but here submission is to truth, and this is an active decision to fight against baser impulses.

Science, Art, and Religion Are Friends: A Review Revisited

Today is a cheat day. In the interest of producing more content, I’ve been toying with revisiting things I’ve written for school over the last 15 years. I’m posting this book review dated October 17, 2005 because I intend to look again at one the essays discussed below. The conflict between science and religion, as well as between science and art, are perennial concerns and prime examples of false dilemma. Stephen J. Gould was a rare popular and respected scientist who understood the connections between these apparently disparate fields.